Making Sense of Autism

Available Workshops
by Susan Golubock



SELF-ADVOCACY IS FOR EVERYONE:
Protecting and Promoting One's Needs

INTENDED AUDIENCE:
Autistic individuals, direct support workers, parents of adolescents or adults.

    • Self-Advocacy Needs a Partner: Modeling, Mimicking and Motivation

    • Objectives:
      • Explore the sensory processing conflicts between partners that can inflame or interfere with the motivation to advocate.

      • Learn how to use your partner's processing strengths to get your message across.

      • Increase understanding of how important modeling and mimicking are in the development of self-advocacy skills.

    • Teaching/Learning Self-Advocacy: Tools and Strategies
      Objectives:
      • Explore tools/strategies for teaching/learning not just rights but also responsibilities.

      • Explore tools/strategies for developing the self-awareness and self-monitoring needed to self-advocate.

      • Learn how to use organizational aids and routines to teach/learn self-advocacy.

      • Explore tools/strategies that tap into one's strengths and enhance the effectiveness of self-advocacy.


SELF-DETERMINATION:
The Roles of Advocates, Allies and Support People

INTENDED AUDIENCE:
Autistic individuals, advocates, rehabilitation professionals, educators, clinicians, caseworkers, and administrators.

    • Understanding One's Sensory Processing Strengths and Limitations

    • Objectives:
      • Discover and compare your sensory profile with the individual with whom you are working.

      • Learn how processing differences can result in behaviors that are often misinterpreted, on both sides.

    • Creating Opportunities for Self-Advocacy By Understanding the Sensory Processing Issues Preventing It

    • Objectives:
      • Learn to recognize different processing, perception and response abilities that interfere with the development of self-advocacy.

      • Learn how shared sensory experiences can build the trust, control and choice-making abilities needed to promote the natural development of self-advocacy.

    • Self-Advocacy Needs a Partner: Modeling, Mimicking and Motivation
      Objectives:
      • Explore the sensory processing conflicts between partners that can inflame or interfere with the motivation to advocate.

      • Learn how to use your partner's processing strengths to get your message across.

      • Increase understanding of how important modeling and mimicking are in the development of self-advocacy skills.

    • Using Assistive Devices to Improve Organization and Make Tasks Easier in the Work Environment

    • Objectives:
      • Identify devices that match one's learning strengths and the task one is attempting to do.

      • Learn strategies for getting, and staying, organized that match one's learning strengths.

      [NOTE: "Understanding one's sensory processing strengths and limitations" is strongly recommended as a companion session to this one.]


LIVING IN A NEUROTYPICAL WORLD:
Increasing Understanding and Decreasing Stress

INTENDED AUDIENCE:
Autistic individuals and/or those who live and work with them.

    • Understanding one's sensory processing strengths and limitations

    • Objectives:
      • Discover your own sensory profile

      • Learn how processing differences can result in behaviors that are often misinterpreted

    • Sharing of sensory experiences in relationships

    • Objectives:
      • Learn the purpose of sensory play in normal development, and explore why autistic leisure pursuits differ

      • Learn strategies for discovering sensory interests in other people and expanding your own

    • Dealing with Sensory Issues In Everyday Activities and Interactions

    • Objectives:
      • Learn strategies for decreasing sensory stress during one's day

      • Learn how to use a sensory diet to improve or restore one's functional state.

    • Using assistive devices to improve organization and make tasks easier

    • Objectives:
      • Identify devices that match one's learning strengths and the task one is attempting to do

      • Learn strategies for getting, and staying, organized that match one's learning strengths.

      [NOTE: "Understanding one's sensory processing strengths and limitations" is strongly recommended as a companion session to this one.]


CHILD CARE THE AUTLY WAY:
Practical Skills for Working with Autistic Children

INTENDED AUDIENCE:
Parents, grandparents, respite care and habilitation workers, day care workers, babysitters, group home workers, education and support staff, administrators, staff trainers, recreational program leaders.

    • Autistic Behaviors from a Sensory-Motor Perspective

    • Objectives:
      • Understanding the sensory and motor processing of autistic children

      • How processing differences can result in behaviors that are often misinterpreted

    • Facilitating Natural Play and Peer Interactions

    • Objectives:
      • The purpose of sensory play in normal development, and why autistic play differs

      • Strategies for motivating purposeful interactive play with autistic children

    • Sensory Issues In Self-Care

    • Objectives:
      • Strategies for avoiding sensory distress during self-care activities

      • Using self-care activities to promote improved sensory processing

    • Adapting Group Activities to Facilitate Inclusion

    • Objectives:
      • Identifying important characteristics of the child and the activity

      • Adapting activities to successfully include an autistic child


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If you are interested in scheduling a Making Sense of Autism Workshop for your group, please contact us at makingsenseofautism@msn.com or mail or fax Request Form to Making Sense of Autism, PO Box 11937, Chandler, AZ 85248-11937, fax: 480-802-9104